Friday, August 17, 2007

Problem? What Problem?

I've just read a news story that is making my blood boil. The Census Bureau, more concerned with an accurate count than the security of Americans, has asked that raids conducted by Immigration and Customs Enforcement be halted during the 2010 count.

You know what I want? I want this to be a non-issue by 2010. There's no excuse for this to be an issue now, but our leaders simply don't have the gumption to act despite continued demands from those of us who voted for them to act now and quit procrastinating. By 2010, we should have not only come up with a sweeping plan that will solve our not-so-little problem--we should be able to say by then that illegal immigration isn't a problem anymore. The fact that we're looking that far into the future and not anticipating a solution is absolutely ludicrous.

What other nation on this planet allows people to sneak in, steal education, healthcare, housing assistance and legal aid, commit crimes, and thank them for "taking the jobs nobody else wants?" Which government do we see offering amnesty to the foreigners who flaunt their laws because they're such hard workers? If I were caught sneaking across the Mexican border for so much as a bottle of tequila, I'd be arrested and thrown in a Mexican jail--where I'd be locked in an overcrowded, filthy cell with no bed, no plumbing, and my family would have to feed and clothe me, while anything sent would be picked through by the Mexican jailers. You wouldn't hear about it in the news, either. Americans don't want to hear about how bad the other guys are; our mainstream media wants to talk about how bad we are. God knows we'd shrivel up and die without our daily dose of self-loathing drama.

In the last few days, more innocent Americans have become victims to the wave of these "guest workers" that are demanding we step aside for them. Alejandro Xuya-Sian, an illegal from Mexico, was so drunk he didn't realize he'd hit a man and was dragging him until he got a mile down the road; he casually stopped, dislodged his victim from the wheel well of his SUV, and continued his trek until he wrapped his SUV around a tree two miles later. And in Houston, Juan Felix Salinas--who was out of custody on bail for a serious assault on one of his relatives--got drunk and got behind the wheel. He plowed his truck into a car carrying a family of three; the car caught fire and while bystanders desperately tried to save the innocent victims, all three died there. This is all since MONDAY. Yeah...they're all here to work. Stop the raids, stop the deportations, stop enforcing the law and recognizing the sovereignty of America because they're all just good people trying to make a living.

The Census Bureau's request is born of a belief that the police departments in sanctuary cities such as LA, Houston and Boston all share: the idea that enforcing immigration law makes illegals afraid to come forward when a crime is committed. This is a ridiculous reason to actively protect illegal invaders. If this is your belief, you might as well take it a step farther and argue that putting criminals in jail discourages them from telling the truth. When you begin to make such baseless arguments to protect anyone who commits a crime (yes, I count illegal entry as a crime), you open the door to all who commit crimes to argue the same things and win in court. The law must prevail. Otherwise we are a nation without identity and the American dream will eventually die.

To those running law enforcement agencies in sanctuary cities...you folks are fond of defending your position because of how much harder your job would be if the illegals felt "afraid" to come forward. I have only one response to this utterly stupid idea:

If we'd shut down our borders and send the illegals back to wherever they came from (and put the bad guys in jail NOW), we wouldn't have this problem.

1 comment:

mail said...

I saw this story, too, but I was too livid to write responsibly about it. (You know how I get.)

Anyway, I officially second all of your thoughts on the matter.